Url.https'>

'We drank our urine and fuel to survive' - Nigerian-Libya returnees narrate horrific experiences

On Thursday, November 30, 2017, 153 Nigerian migrants, including men, women, and children returned from Libya aboard a Libyan chartered flight at about 9:15pm, just two days after 239 Nigerian were returned following the ongoing slave trade crisis.

Out of the 153 Nigerian migrants who returned on Thursday, a few of them narrated the challenges they encountered before getting to Libya and horrific experiences they suffered at the hands of their abductors.

Speaking with Saturday Punch, 20-year-old Clement Chibuzor, a Delta State indigene, was working as a Plaster of Paris artisan when his father met a trafficker, who told him he could help his son to Europe.

According to him, he had worked for eight months and was able to save up little money, but his father told him not to worry and sold his land to help him out.

“I never thought about going to Europe. My father was the one who brought the idea. He sold his land and raised N450,000 which he gave to my ‘burger’ (trafficker). He did not tell my mother until I was already in Libya,” Chibuzor said.

The young who spent 18 months in Libya, continued: “After many of my co-travellers died in the desert, I was kidnapped as soon as I got to Libya. I was in prison for four months until my father sent N300,000 for my release.

“In the prison, our food was a piece of bread every day. When I got out of the prison. I was on the street one day when I met a Nigerian who promised to help me. I worked in his house for some weeks until he sold me to a gang. They kept me in a cell. I was there for a very long time. I cannot count the number of people who died in the cell.

“The police were raiding different places where black people were kept and I willingly surrendered to the police. That was how I got an opportunity to come back to Nigeria.

“While working on the streets of Libya, if the gangs saw you, they would grab you and put you in a cell. They put you in a cell with many others where you would either be sold or made to call your people to pay for your freedom.

“While I was trying to get money the to free myself from the prison, I spoke with my father two months ago. He then told me that if I had the chance, I should return home. I told him that I might die before I had the opportunity to return home because I saw people die every day.”

Loading...
Previous
Next Post »